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Kanellos the Greek Protest Dog – Pet in the News

May 07, 2010 By: admin Category: All Sick Dog Blog Posts, Kanellos the Greek Protest Dog, Pets In The News

Kanellos the Greek Protest Dog attends riots and protests across Athens. (Photo by Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP)

Kanellos the Greek Protest Dog is garnering attention, as the canine resident of Athens made an appearance during the May 6, 2010 protests in Greece! As a pet owner, I found the photos of Kanellos the Greek Protest Dog to be very compelling, so I thought I’d share a couple images in today’s post on The Sick Dog Blog!

“Kanellos” translates into”Cinnamon” in English  (as a Greek-American, I can confirm this!) Kanellos the Greek Protest Dog seems to thrive in situations of political unrest and the photos portray a dog who is comfortable in some very incredible situations!

Kanellos the Greek Protest Dog has been appearing at Athens protests and riots since 2008. He has been spotted at dozens of protests, making him famous in Athens and beyond. It’s incredible that this dog has captured the attention of many different photographers from many prominent agencies, including the Associated Press and Reuters, so there is an extensive record of his attendance at protests and riots in Athens!



Who Owns Kanellos the Greek Protest Dog? Is he a Stray?

As a conscientious dog owner, I am rather stunned that an owner would bring his dog to a protest due to the potential for injury or worse. The general consensus is that Kanellos the dog does have an owner, due to his collar/tags, his fairly well-kept appearance and due to the fact that he just “happens” to show up at these political events – clearly, a political enthusiast is bringing him to these riots and protests. What are the chances that a stray dog would just happen to find his way to protests and riots, occurring in different areas of a very large city over the course of two years? Fairly remote.

Despite some in-depth research on the web, I was unable to locate anyone who claims ownership of Kanellos. As the Greek dog’s story spreads, it will be interesting to see if anyone comes forward to publicly claim ownership.

Kanellos the Greek Riot Dog carries something in his mouth as he navigates fires and a a debris-strewn street following an Athens protest. (Kanellos the Greek Riot Dog joins protestors and rioters in Athens. (Photo by Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images)

Kanellos the Greek Riot Dog carries something in his mouth as he navigates fires and a a debris-strewn street following an Athens protest. (Kanellos the Greek Riot Dog joins protestors and rioters in Athens. (Photo by Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images)

Another theory is that this dog is actually one of Athen’s many stray dogs. I have family living in Athens, so I’ve spent months in the city and can attest to the fact that there is a significant stray dog and stray cat population in the Greek capital. But they tend to look stray – not the case for this dog! This could be explained by this theory: some say that the protesters fell in love with this dog and they’ve been caring for and feeding him.

Did Kanellos the Greek Protest Dog Die?

Another theory (perhaps, an online rumor) holds that the original dog known as Kanellos the Greek Protest Dog died. It’s said that this dog is similar in appearance to Kanellos; some claim his name is actually Louk – short for “Loukanikos,” which translates into “Sausage” in English. (It’s said that the people feed him sausages, hence the name.)

According to some reports, he’s also known as “Rebel Dog” or “Riot Dog.” He is well-known in Greece, where he’s viewed as an icon of Greek solidarity.

It’s said that Louk the Greek Riot Dog spends his days in the Exarchia neighborhood on Mesolongiou Street in Athens. My mom is returning to Athens next month, so I’ll be sending her to Mesolongiou Street with a camera and an assignment: Find This Dog! She’s been given an assignment to check his collar for tags (you can see the tags in at least one photo). It will be interesting to see if “Kanellos” or “Louk” is engraved on the tags. The Sick Dog Blog staff will let you know how it goes.  ;-)

Kanellos the Greek Protest Dog – Learn More and View Photos

Photos of Kanellos the Greek Protest Dog are the subject of a slideshow on the UK Guardian website; he also has a video on YouTube!

Want to keep up with the latest news on this famous canine? Kanellos the Greek Protest Dog has his own Facebook Fan Page!

Kanellos the Greek Riot Dog joins protestors and rioters in Athens. (Photo by Nikolas Giakoumidis/AP)

Kanellos the Greek Riot Dog joins protestors and rioters in Athens. (Photo by Nikolas Giakoumidis/AP)

Kanellos the Greek Protest Dog seems unimpressed by the Athens police in riot gear! (Photo by John Kolesidis/Reuters)

Kanellos the Protest Dog poses for the camera during a protest in Greece. (Aris Messinis – AFP/Getty Images)

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Fire Ant Bite Treatment for Dogs – How to Treat a Dog’s Fire Ant Stings

March 25, 2010 By: admin Category: All Sick Dog Blog Posts, Allergic Reaction Symptoms in Dogs, Dog Allergies to Stings and Bites, Dog First Aid and Veterinary Emergencies, Dog Injuries, Fire Ant Bites in Dogs, First Aid for Stings and Bites, General Dog Health, Insect Bites and Stings, Symptoms of Anaphylaxis in Dogs, Treating Fire Ant Bites and Stings

Learn How to Treat Fire Ant Bites and Stings in Dogs and Learn the Symptoms of Allergic Reactions in Dogs With a Fire Ant Allergy. (Jithin K.U. Photo)

Pet owners living in the southeastern United States and South America — locations where fire ants are present — may be interested in my latest article, titled How to Treat Fire Ant Bites in a Dog – Insect Sting Treatment in Dogs, Allergic Reaction Symptoms in Pets.

This article discusses how to remove fire ants from a dog’s body (there’s a right way and a wrong way to do this – the wrong way will result in many more fire ant stings!), how to treat fire ant bites in dogs, along with how to recognize the symptoms of anaphylaxis due to a fire ant allergy.

Treating Fire Ant Stings in a Dog Who’s Allergic to Fire Ant Venom

Unfortunately, this latest pet care article was inspired by experience. On Tuesday, March 23, 2010, I was out for a game of fetch with my pit bull, Sasha-Simöne, when she stepped in a fire ant nest. (Fire ants are very uncommon in southwest Florida.) Just a few fire ant bites triggered an acute response in my robust, peppy and healthy pit bull.

This dog’s fire ant stings caused a near-instantaneous reaction – white gums,  low blood pressure, vomiting, a refusal to walk and swelling to the leg that sustained the fire ant stings. Fortunately, Sasha-Simone has recovered and she’s now doing well, although we are still caring for her fire ant bites and the veterinarian recommended a course of Benadryl. Benadryl is safe for dogs; it’s given to treat minor allergic reactions, therefore, it’s an effective way to treat itching from fire ant bites in a dog.

(Please note that not all over-the-counter medications are safe for dogs; pet owners should never give Benadryl or any other over-the-counter medication to a dog or cat before consulting a veterinarian. Some OTC medications —like Tylenol and Ibuprofen — are deadly for dogs and cats and even “safe” medications can elicit a deadly reaction in a dog who has certain medical conditions or in a dog who takes other medications. And some over-the-counter drugs are safe for dogs, but deadly to cats, and vice versa. So always consult a veterinarian before giving over-the-counter medication to a dog or cat. Okay, that’s the end of the OTC medication and pets spiel! )



How to Treat a Dog’s Fire Ant Bites and Prevent Infection

This pet care article also discusses how to treat a dog’s fire ant stings in the days following the attack. Fire ant bite pustules will form within 12 to 36 hours after the stings occur (note: fire ant bites are actually a bite and sting in one – these little red ants bite away a little chunk of skin, while simultaneously injecting venom). If the pet’s ant bites are not treated properly, an infection will occur.

Fire ant bites are itchy – very itchy! In response, dogs bite and scratch at the fire ant bites frequently and intensely.  This makes a dog’s fire ant bites more prone to infection, since they’re apt to break open the pustules and the act of scratching introduces bacteria from the dog’s mouth and feet, thereby contaminating the fire ant bites. This article explains how to clean fire ant bites in a way that reduces the chance of infection, and it provides information on how to recognize the symptoms of infected insect stings in a dog.

Pet owners will also learn how to treat the dog’s itching from fire ant stings, which can be extremely itchy, yet painful. Swelling from the ant bites will also require treatment.

To learn more, read How to Treat Fire Ant Bites in a Dog – Insect Sting Treatment in Dogs, Allergic Reaction Symptoms in Pets.

Pet owners may also want to learn more about how to treat fire ant bites in humans, as there’s a good chance the owner will sustain at least a few stings and bites while trying to help the dog.

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